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Institutes & Centers > The Center for Legal Pedagogy > Publications

Through its research studies and publications, the Center offers faculty and students pedagogical assistance with academic performance and skills by providing information about instructional design and outcomes assessment. Its publications include:

Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips
Teaching Quick Tips
New Directions in Legal Education
Legal Writing Tips

Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – a pedagogical newsletter published online during the academic year by the Center for faculty and scholars to exchange teaching ideas.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 1 – Using a Law-School Version of “SQ3R” with Sepuential Syllabus Question Designed to Enhance Student Learning.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 2 – Classroom Assessment Techniques.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 3 – How to Write Learning Outcomes that Reflect Course Objectives & Student Competencies.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 4 – Enhancing Student Learning: Critiquing Behavioral Objectives, Performance Goals, Conditions, and Standards.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 5 – Some Tips for Developing Your 2005-2006 Course Syllabus.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 6 – Competency Assessment: Developing Measures to Assess a Law Student’s Competency.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 7 – Evaluating Test Data: Doing Assessments.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 8 – Teaching & Assessing Course Competencies: A Faculty Discussion.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tip – Tip No. 9 – Measuring Test Difficulty: A Follow Up.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 10 – Teaching & Assessing Course Competencies: Writing Better Exam and Assessment Exercises, Measuring Test Difficulty, and Tracking Student Progress.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 11 – Assessing and Testing with TWEN.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 12 – Ready, Set, Action…Videotaping a Class to Improve Teaching.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 13 – Some “Best Practices” for Drafting Law-School Exam Questions.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 14 – Using the Watson Glaser to Assess the Critical Thinking Skills of Law Students.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 15 – Using the LASSI to Assess the Learning and Study Strategies of Law Students.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 16 – Using the Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI) to Assess the Learning Styles of Law Students.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 17 – Using the Writing Diagnostic Exam to Assess the Writing Skills of Law Students.

Link to Law School Teaching Innovations/Tips – Tip No. 18 – Teaching the Traditional Law School Curriculum: An Assessment Whether Pedagogy Can Improve Bar Examination Performance at TMSL.

New Directions in Legal Education – a multi-discipline pedagogical newsletter, published online twice a year in the fall and spring by the Center for scholars to exchange ideas and report on research about (1) the acquisition and assessment of lawyering skills, (2) the evaluation of instructional design and teaching strategies, and (3) the implications of the cognitive sciences in legal education. Published during 2000-2001, the newsletter is again accepting articles that will be published in the fall of 2006.

Link to Volume 1 Issue 1 – Thurgood Marshall School of Law Establishes Center for Legal Pedagogy – Instructional Design: A Report on Resources

Legal Writing Tips – an on-line newsletter about legal writing that is published by the Center for Legal Pedagogy. It is designed to help law students develop a professional legal voice by offering helpful points about grammar, syntax, rhetoric, punctuation, and style; discussing research about legal writing; and making information available about legal writing resources.

Volume I (Tip No. 1 – Tip No. 22/September 2005-May 2006)

Editors

Aiesha Dennis
Shalonda Lewter
Marisela Maddox
Be’Atrice McFarland
Donna Simmons

Advisor

Professor Anthony Palasota

Link to Tip No. 1 – Thinking about Legal Writing: The What & How of Legal Writing 

Tip No. 1 provides some thoughts about legal writing from the Preface to the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004.

Link to Tip No. 2 – Thinking about Legal Writing: The What & How of Legal Writing: Macro/Micro Organization … Using Marginalia

Tip No. 2 provides some thoughts about how to organize a final product once a writer has tentatively chosen the content.  It is based on Chapter 1 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004.

Link to Tip No. 3 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Developing a Didactic Style … Using Internal Cueing

Tip No. 3 provides some thoughts about “internal cuing” from Chapter 1 to the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004. 

Tip No. 3 also provides information about a new edition of Eugene Voloch’s Academic Legal Writing Style.

Link to Tip No. 4 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Using Introductory “Set Ups”

Tip No. 4 provides some thoughts about using introductory “set ups” from Chapter 1 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004. 

Tip No. 4 also provides information about the new 18th edition of The Blue Book: A Uniform System of Citation

Link to Tip No. 5 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Using Thesis Statements

Tip No. 5 provides some thoughts about using thesis statements from the Chapter 1 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004. 

Tip No. 5 also provides information about The Aspen Handbook for Legal Writers – A Practical Reference by Deborah E. Bouchoux of Georgetown University.  

Link to Tip No. 6 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Using Writing Roadmaps

Tip No. 6 provides some thoughts about using writing roadmaps from Chapter 1 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004. 

Tip No. 6 also provides information The Redbook – A Manual on Legal Style by Bryan A. Garner, the editor-in-chief of Black’s Law Dictionary

Link to Tip No. 7 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Using Heading and Subheadings

Tip No. 7 provides some thoughts about using headings and subheadings from Chapter 1 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004. 

Tip No. 7 also provides information about helpful resources for writing a law-school seminar paper. 

Link to Tip No. 8 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Writing Good Paragraphs with Topic Sentences

Tip No. 8 provides some thoughts about writing good paragraphs with topic sentences from Chapter 1 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004. 

Tip No. 8 also provides information about helpful resources for writing a law-school research paper.

Link to Tip No. 9 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Using Transitions Effectively

Tip No. 9 provides some thoughts about using transitions effectively from Chapter 1 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004. 

Tip No. 9 also provides information about Basic Legal Research – Tools and Strategies by Professor Amy E. Sloan, who teaches at the University of Baltimore School of Law.

Link to Tip No. 10 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Dealing with Problems that Affect a Text’s Readability – The Overuse (or the Inadvertent Use) of the Passive Voice

Tip No. 10 provides some thoughts about the use of the passive voice from Chapter 2 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004.

Link to Tip No. 11 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Dealing with Problems of Sentence Length

Tip No. 11 provides some thoughts about how to deal with problems of sentence length from Chapter 2 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004.

Link to Tip No. 12 – Thinking about Legal Writing: dealing with “Left-Handed” Sentences

Tip No. 12 provides some thoughts about how to deal with “left-handed” sentences from Chapter 2 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004.

Tip No. 12 also provides information about writing resources for students who are considering judicial clerkships.

Link to Tip No. 13 – Thinking about Legal Writing: Dealing with Faulty Parallelism

Tip No. 13 provides some thoughts about how to deal with faulty parallelism from Chapter 2 of the Guide to Legal Writing Style by Terri LeClercq, Senior Lecturer and Fellow, the Norman W. Black Professor in Ethical Communications Law at the University of Texas School of Law.  The 3rd edition of the Guide to Legal Writing Style was published by Aspen Law & Business in 2004.

Link to Tip No. 14 – The Structural Levels of Sentences: Superordination-Subordination-Coordination

Tip No. 14 focuses on the coordination and subordination of ideas; it discusses the structural levels of sentences and their hierarchical arrangement, and it shows how to enhance the readability of a paragraph.

Link to Tip No. 15 – The Functional Roles of Sentences: Rhetorical-Generalizing-Sequencing-Relating-Developing

Tip No. 15 discusses the functional roles of sentences within a paragraph.

Link to Tip No. 16 – A Quick Reference Guide to Make Page Numbers Line Up

With many law students writing legal briefs this term, Tip No. 16 provides a Quick Reference Guide to help students make the page numbers line-up on the right-hand side with tabs when using Microsoft Word, Word Perfect, and Corel Word Perfect, and to help students troubleshoot when periods, spaces, and tabs have been inserted.

Link to Tip No. 17 – Some Helpful Texts for Law Students: A Book to Help Deal with Legalese and a Booklet to Help Deal with Law School Stress

Tip No. 17 provides information about some helpful texts for law students:  (1) a book to help deal with legalese entitled Lifting the Fog of Legalese: Essays on Plain Language by Professor Joseph Kimble from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan and (2) a booklet to help deal with stress entitled The Hidden Sources of Law School Stress: Avoiding the Mistakes that Create Unhappy and Unprofessional Lawyers by Professor Larry Krieger from Florida State University College of Law.

Link to Tip No. 18 – A Helpful Text for Law Students: The New Edition of the ALWD Citation Manual Is Released

Tip No. 18 provides information about a helpful text for law students. Aspen Publishers has recently released the Third Edition of the ALWD Citation Manual: A Professional System of Citation.  Written by the Association of Legal Writing Directors under the direction of Dean Darby Dickerson from Stetson University College of Law, the Third Edition of the ALWD Citation Manual is a 608-page standardized guide that presents a single, consistent system of citation for all forms of legal writing in a clear, attractive, and easy-to-use format.

Link to Tip No. 19 – Some Helpful Texts for Law Students: Writing a legal Memo and Pass the Bar!

Tip No. 19 provides information about helpful texts for law students: Writing a Legal Memo by Professor John Bronsteen, from Loyola University Chicago, School of Law, and Pass the Bar! by Professor Denise Riebe from Duke University School of Law and Professor Michael Schwartz from Western State University College of Law.

Link to Tip No. 20 – A Helpful Article about the Appellate Process Written for Law Students

With many law students working on appellate briefs this semester, Tip No. 20 provides information about a timely article written by Professor Amy Sloan from the University of Baltimore School of Law that has been published in the University of Baltimore Law Review that is entitled Appellate Fruit Salad and Other Concepts: A Short Course in Appellate Process.

Volume 2 (No. 1 – No. 25/August 2006-April2007)

Volume 3 (Tip No. 1 – Tip No. 2)

Volume 4 (Tip No. 1 – Tip No. 3)

   
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